Tel: 020 7433 1444

Doctor Today

Private Medical Centre

Trustpilot

Services and Prices - Travel Medication

Choose a Service
Yellow fever £85.00
Typhoid £50.00
Tetanus, Diphtheria and Polio £60.00
Hepatitis A per dose £60.00
Hepatitis A & Typhoid per dose £85.00
Hepatitis B per dose £50.00
Hepatitis B Paediatric per dose £50.00
Hepatitis A & B per dose £80.00
Hepatitis A & B Paediatric per dose £80.00
Mantoux test £70.00
Cholera per course £105.00
Tuberculosis (BCG) £75.00
Japanese encephalitis per dose £130.00
Meningitis per dose £90.00
Rabies per dose £70.00
Tick-borne encephalitis per dose £80.00
Malarone anti-malarial tablets per tablet £4.00
anti-malarial tablets Paediatric per tablet £2.50
Travel clinic consultation free* £45.00

Yellow fever

  • Stamaril.

For more information visit the WHO website.

Please do not hesitate to contact us if you have any further questions or wish to make an appointment. For information on how to get in touch see our contact us page.

Typhoid

Generally typhoid is not a disease that is contracted in developed countries. However, if travelling to areas where the disease is endemic and the water and food supplies unregulated, typhoid is a real danger. Vaccination can help prevent infection or make the disease milder than it otherwise would have been, but is not a substitute for being careful about the water you drink, washing hands after going to the toilet and before eating, or the food you eat. One dose of the injectable (inactivated) vaccine normally lasts for 2 to 3 years and mild soreness at the site is the only frequent side effect. The modern vaccine is quite different from the extremely painful and reactive vaccines that used to be given in the past. A (live) oral vaccine has been developed but has been withdrawn for the meantime due to problems experienced with it, so is not currently available at Doctor Today. Further general information about typhoid is available from the Centre for Disease Control website.

Please do not hesitate to contact us if you have any further questions or wish to make an appointment. For information on how to get in touch see our contact us page.

Tetanus, Diphtheria and Polio

  • Revaxis
  • Td/IPV

For more information visit the department of health website

Please do not hesitate to contact us if you have any further questions or wish to make an appointment. For information on how to get in touch see our contact us page.

Hepatitis A

  • Havrix Monodose
  • Normal course 2 doses

Hepatitis A or "yellow jaundice" (fact sheet) is a liver disease generally contracted by virus contaminated water or food in an endemic area. Immunisation is recommended for travel to all warm countries including Africa, Asia (except Japan), parts of the Caribbean, Central and South America, Eastern Europe, the Mediterranean Basin, and the Middle East. Two shots are required at 0 and 6-12 months. It makes sense to take advantage of the combined typhoid-hepatitis A vaccine for the first shot as typhoid is spread in similar areas by the same means. The second shot is given either separately or combined with the third dose of the Hepatitis B vaccine (Twinrix).

Please do not hesitate to contact us if you have any further questions or wish to make an appointment. For information on how to get in touch see our contact us page.

Hepatitis A & Typhoid

  • Hepatyrix

Hepatitis A vaccination

Hepatitis A or "yellow jaundice" (fact sheet) is a liver disease generally contracted by virus contaminated water or food in an endemic area. Immunisation is recommended for travel to all warm countries including Africa, Asia (except Japan), parts of the Caribbean, Central and South America, Eastern Europe, the Mediterranean Basin, and the Middle East. Two shots are required at 0 and 6 months. It makes sense to take advantage of the combined typhoid-hepatitis A vaccine for the first shot as typhoid is spread in similar areas by the same means. The second shot is given either separately or combined with the third dose of the Hepatitis B vaccine (Twinrix).

Typhoid vaccination

Generally typhoid is not a disease that is contracted in developed countries. However, if travelling to areas where the disease is endemic and the water and food supplies unregulated, typhoid is a real danger. Vaccination can help prevent infection or make the disease milder than it otherwise would have been, but is not a substitute for being careful about the water you drink, washing hands after going to the toilet and before eating, or the food you eat. One dose of the injectable (inactivated) vaccine normally lasts for 2 to 3 years and mild soreness at the site is the only frequent side effect. The modern vaccine is quite different from the extremely painful and reactive vaccines that used to be given in the past. A (live) oral vaccine has been developed but has been withdrawn for the meantime due to problems experienced with it, so is not currently available at Doctor Today. Further general information about typhoid is available from the Centre for Disease Control website.

Please do not hesitate to contact us if you have any further questions or wish to make an appointment. For information on how to get in touch see our contact us page.

Hepatitis B

  • Engerix-B
  • Normal course 3 doses

Hepatitis B vaccination (adult)

Hepatitis B (fact sheet) is relatively uncommon in the UK, but we advise all adults who are not already immune to consider getting vaccinated, particularly if travelling abroad or if they have had or are considering having intimate contact with a positive carrier or person of unknown status. The course consists of three injections (the first and last of which may be combined with the Hepatitis A vaccine) at 0, 1 and 6 months. This should provide lasting immunity up to 10 years, but boosters may be required if antibody response after the last vaccination is poor. Note that this vaccination is not recommended for administration during pregnancy; however, during this time immunoglobulin injections can be given to protect after a high risk exposure. Information about Hepatitis B vaccinations in children can be found on the British Medical Association website.

Please do not hesitate to contact us if you have any further questions or wish to make an appointment. For information on how to get in touch see our contact us page.

Hepatitis B Paediatric

  • Engerix-B
  • Normal course 3 doses

Information about Hepatitis B vaccinations in children can be found on the British Medical Association website.

Please do not hesitate to contact us if you have any further questions or wish to make an appointment. For information on how to get in touch see our contact us page.

Hepatitis A & B

  • Twinrix

Hepatitis A vaccination

Hepatitis A or "yellow jaundice" (fact sheet) is a liver disease generally contracted by virus contaminated water or food in an endemic area. Immunisation is recommended for travel to all warm countries including Africa, Asia (except Japan), parts of the Caribbean, Central and South America, Eastern Europe, the Mediterranean Basin, and the Middle East. Two shots are required at 0 and 6 months. It makes sense to take advantage of the combined typhoid-hepatitis A vaccine for the first shot as typhoid is spread in similar areas by the same means. The second shot is given either separately or combined with the third dose of the Hepatitis B vaccine (Twinrix).

Hepatitis B vaccination (adult)

Hepatitis B (fact sheet) is relatively uncommon in the UK, but we advise all adults who are not already immune to consider getting vaccinated, particularly if travelling abroad or if they have had or are considering having intimate contact with a positive carrier or person of unknown status. The course consists of three injections (the first and last of which may be combined with the Hepatitis A vaccine) at 0, 1 and 6 months. This should provide lasting immunity up to 10 years, but boosters may be required if antibody response after the last vaccination is poor. Note that this vaccination is not recommended for administration during pregnancy; however, during this time immunoglobulin injections can be given to protect after a high risk exposure. Information about Hepatitis B vaccinations in children can be found on the British Medical Association website.

Please do not hesitate to contact us if you have any further questions or wish to make an appointment. For information on how to get in touch see our contact us page.

Hepatitis A & B Paediatric

  • Twinrix
  • Normal course 3 doses

Hepatitis A vaccination

Hepatitis A or "yellow jaundice" (fact sheet) is a liver disease generally contracted by virus contaminated water or food in an endemic area. Immunisation is recommended for travel to all warm countries including Africa, Asia (except Japan), parts of the Caribbean, Central and South America, Eastern Europe, the Mediterranean Basin, and the Middle East. Two shots are required at 0 and 6 months. It makes sense to take advantage of the combined typhoid-hepatitis A vaccine for the first shot as typhoid is spread in similar areas by the same means. The second shot is given either separately or combined with the third dose of the Hepatitis B vaccine (Twinrix).

Hepatitis B vaccination

Information about Hepatitis B vaccinations in children can be found on the British Medical Association website.

Please do not hesitate to contact us if you have any further questions or wish to make an appointment. For information on how to get in touch see our contact us page.

Mantoux test

  • Tuberculin PPD test
  • Includes result certificate

Children over 6 years of age and adults are required to have a mantoux test (PPD skin test) before having a BCG vaccine. This skin test detects exposure to TB, either through vaccination or exposure to the disease, often resulting in immunity. 

You will need to return to the practice 48-72 hours after the mantoux test to have it read.

If the skin test come back negative (no reaction noted on the skin) then a BCG vaccine may be indicated. If the skin test is positive (reaction on the skin) then no BCG vaccine is required. 

For more information about the Mantoux test click here.

Please do not hesitate to contact us if you have any further questions or wish to make an appointment. For information on how to get in touch see our contact us page.

Cholera

  • Dukoral oral vaccine
  • 2 dose course
A major recent breakthrough has been the development of an oral vaccine (Dukoral) which is effective against cholera. Cholera is a serious, sometimes fatal, diarrhoeal disease which can lead to the loss of up to 20 litres of your body fluid in 24 hours, so it is advisable to take the vaccination ahead of any planned trip to affected areas. Two doses are required, taken between one and six weeks apart.

Dukoral is not licensed in the UK for the prevention of travellers' diarrhoea but can protect up to 60% of people who take the vaccine from travellers' diarrhoea caused by ETEC (enterotoxinogenic E. Coli) bacteria. It is NOT a substitute for careful attention to food and water hygiene. You may also consider talking to your doctor about taking a course of antibiotics (e.g. ciprofloxacin, trimethoprim) with you in case of an infection which is not responding to simple rehydration measures.

In terms of side effects, Dukoral is generally well tolerated but occasionally people experience diarrheoa, abdominal cramps and/or nausea. Additional information about Dukoral is available from the Canadian Ministry of Health's Travellers Health Guide website.

Please do not hesitate to contact us if you have any further questions or wish to make an appointment. For information on how to get in touch see our contact us page.

Tuberculosis (BCG)

Children over 6 years of age and adults are required to have a mantoux test (PPD skin test) before having a BCG vaccine. This skin test detects exposure to TB, either through vaccination or exposure to the disease, often resulting in immunity. 

You will need to return to the practice 48-72 hours after the mantoux test to have it read.

If the skin test come back negative (no reaction noted on the skin) then a BCG vaccine may be indicated. If the skin test is positive (reaction on the skin) then no BCG vaccine is required. 

Please note that reactions of more than 15mm may indicate that you require a chest x-ray. This is mandatory for USA immigration and for pre-employment purposes.

For more information visit the travel health website.

Please do not hesitate to contact us if you have any further questions or wish to make an appointment. For information on how to get in touch see our contact us page.

Japanese encephalitis

  • IXIARO 
  • Normal course 2 doses

For more information visit the WHO website.

Please do not hesitate to contact us if you have any further questions or wish to make an appointment. For information on how to get in touch see our contact us page.

Meningitis

  • Menveo
  • Covers ACW+Y

For more information visit the Menveo website.

Please do not hesitate to contact us if you have any further questions or wish to make an appointment. For information on how to get in touch see our contact us page.

Rabies

  • Normal 3 course dose.

For more information visit the WHO website.

Please do not hesitate to contact us if you have any further questions or wish to make an appointment. For information on how to get in touch see our contact us page.

Tick-borne encephalitis

  • Normal 3 course dose.

For more information visit the WHO website.

Please do not hesitate to contact us if you have any further questions or wish to make an appointment. For information on how to get in touch see our contact us page.

Malarone anti-malarial tablets

At Doctor Today we offer a wide range of anti-malarial medications. Our clinicians will advise you as to the most appropriate medication for you (if any) taking into account factors such as your precise destination(s), length of stay, personal circumstances and medical history. Some of our more commonly-prescribed anti-malarial medications are:

  • Malarone (atovaquone and proguanil hydrochloride)

    Malarone is a combined anti-malarial that is effective against the most severe form of malaria (Plasmodium falciparum). One tablet of Malarone needs to be taken daily starting from one day prior to entering and continuing for one week after leaving a malarious area. The cost per tablet for adults is £4. Paediatric malarone tablets are prescribed according to the weight of the child. The cost is £2.50 per tablet. Discounts are given if other vaccinations are administered at the same consultation.

  • Doxycycline

    Doxycycline is an antibiotic effective in preventing Plasmodium falciparum malaria. It is usually recommended for short term travel to areas where certain strains of malaria that are resistant to other drugs are present. One (100mg) tablet should be taken daily starting from one week prior to entering and continuing for four weeks after leaving a malarious area. Please note that doxycycline is not suitable for children, breastfeeding mothers or pregnant women. The cost of 50 (100mg) tablets is £45 (all inclusive), or if more than 50 tablets are required 90p per tablet.

Additional general information about malaria can be found on the Malaria Hotspots website; for country-specific malaria information, see the NHS Fit for Travel website.

Please do not hesitate to contact us if you have any further questions or wish to make an appointment. For information on how to get in touch see our contact us page.

anti-malarial tablets Paediatric

At Doctor Today we offer a wide range of anti-malarial medications. Our clinicians will advise you as to the most appropriate medication for you (if any) taking into account factors such as your precise destination(s), length of stay, personal circumstances and medical history. Some of our more commonly-prescribed anti-malarial medications are:

  • Malarone (atovaquone and proguanil hydrochloride)

    Malarone is a combined anti-malarial that is effective against the most severe form of malaria (Plasmodium falciparum). One tablet of Malarone needs to be taken daily starting from one day prior to entering and continuing for one week after leaving a malarious area. The cost per tablet for adults is £4. Paediatric malarone tablets are prescribed according to the weight of the child. The cost is £2.50 per tablet. Discounts are given if other vaccinations are administered at the same consultation.

  • Doxycycline

    Doxycycline is an antibiotic effective in preventing Plasmodium falciparum malaria. It is usually recommended for short term travel to areas where certain strains of malaria that are resistant to other drugs are present. One (100mg) tablet should be taken daily starting from one week prior to entering and continuing for four weeks after leaving a malarious area. Please note that doxycycline is not suitable for children, breastfeeding mothers or pregnant women. The cost of 50 (100mg) tablets is £40 (all inclusive), or if more than 50 tablets are required 80p per tablet.

Additional general information about malaria can be found on the Malaria Hotspots website; for country-specific malaria information, see the NHS Fit for Travel website.

Please do not hesitate to contact us if you have any further questions or wish to make an appointment. For information on how to get in touch see our contact us page.

Travel clinic consultation

Our popular fast-track travel clinic at Doctor Today offers you an individually-tailored course of travel vaccinations, anti-malarial medication and travel advice appropriate to your destination(s), length of stay and personal medical circumstances. 


*The consultation for this service is free if vaccinations and/or anti-malarial medications to the value of £45 or more are purchased; otherwise an advice fee of up to £45 applies. We are a registered Yellow Fever Centre.

Detailed medical and pricing information about individual vaccinations or anti-malarials can be found by clicking its corresponding tab.

Please do not hesitate to contact us if you have any further questions or wish to make an appointment. For information on how to get in touch see our contact us page. Note that, ideally, you should start planning at least 12 weeks ahead of travelling, which gives plenty of time to space your vaccinations for maximum effect and safety. Accelerated regimes can be done in as little as 4 to 6 weeks, and in emergency in even less time, although this is not ideal.

To find non-vaccine specific health related travel information for the country you intend to visit, please use our interactive travel guide